Finally. Proof of clothing issue to Einjährig-Freiwilliger.

Tony without Kaiser

Departed
Staff member
So this looks like just a nice little Feldartillerie (Field Artillery) Dunkelblau Krätzchen. But its the interior that makes this a very interesting little cap.

dbch42.jpg


The "common understanding" is that all Einjährig-Freiwilliger (One year volunteer) were required to buy their own uniforms etc.

However, we keep seeing Pickelhaubes and Mütze that stamped as unit issued but they have cloth or paper name tags to an Einjährig-Freiwilliger. :scratch:

dbch42a.jpg


Well, here finally is a Mütze that shows that clothing items were marked as being specifically for issue to Einjährig-Freiwilliger. So the question is, were Pickelhaubes and Mütze (and everything else a soldier wore) issued to the Einjährig-Freiwilliger? That would seem to go against the entire point of the Einjährig-Freiwilliger concept. So perhaps these clothing items were "rented" to the Einjährig-Freiwilliger by the unit?

dbch42c.jpg
 

Larmo

New member
Good point Tony (wonderfully marked hat by the way) I remember owning a regimentally marked artillery helmet with a volunteers name tag inside the crown.

Larmo
 

Gustaf

Well-known member
Staff member
Great Mütze Tony,
If a Einjährig-Freiwilliger had to buy his clothing and helmets, wouldn't it be logical to buy them from the Regimental stores? Or rented as you say, but with the rent price being the same as a purchase price, and a portion retuned when the item is given in depending on the condition.
That would be a logical reason for using the sewn in tag rather than inked in name, This Müte already has a II Garnitur mark.
Best wihses
Gus
 

Robert

New member
Wem die Mittel zum "einjährig"-freiwilligen Dienst fehlen, darf auf einen wohlbegründeten Antrag an das Generalkommando auf Anweisung des letztern vom Truppenteil Geld- und Brotverpflegung, Bekleidung und Quartier erhalten. (Liebau, Die wissenschaftliche Befähigung für den einjährig-freiwilligen Dienst 2. Aufl. 1885)
There was a possibility for OYVs to receive equipment and even free quarters. The OYV had to apply for this to the Generalkommando. When the request was approved, the Generalkommando ordered the corresponding unit to provide free supplies.

Great marking! That regimental stamp with the "E.FR." addition is astonishing. I sometimes wonder about the urge they had to stamp everything even for the smallest units, so they even had an own stamp for OYV clothing.
 

Tony without Kaiser

Departed
Staff member
Gus, that would make perfect sense. Like a 'lease' of sorts. Perhaps to EJF who could not afford to private purchase? This Mütze removes any doubt (from my eyes) that items were made available to EJF, and for field items like Pickelhauben, cartridge pouches, bayonets, boots etc it really makes sense.

Robert, thanks for that. First time I have heard of anything in-line with my suspicions from a period reference. Ja toll!
 

Adler

New member
Great Mütze and great info gentlemen!

Perhaps to EJF who could not afford to private purchase?
I'm not so good at these matters, but an EJF who couldnt' afford his own clothing and then gets it for free seems very odd to me...
Maybe the EJF had to purchase only a part of his equipment and some other (obligatory) garments may have been provided (free) by the army?...
Maybe the garments for use in the field were provided by the army?...
Maybe they just could purchase things at the regimental store when they needed standard or cheaper quality for field use?...
Hhhh... questions, questions...

Adler
 

joerookery

Active member
This was my interpretation after some research.

The uniform equipment of the one-year volunteer required everything to be purchased privately wrong wrong wrong.

All of the four armies of Imperial Germany followed this basic method. one-year volunteers had to pay the unit for their service. Additional equipment and uniforms could be taken at their own expense and risk. You need to read in detail first this section of the army order. Then read the further clarification in one of the one-year volunteer manuals. This one is particularly clear even though it is specific to the field artillery.

Attachment 2 to § 19 of „Heerordnung“

Uniform, food and equipment of one-year volunteers

1. Any OYV has to buy the required pieces of equipment and uniform out of his own money. During their one year of service they have to care about food and accommodation by themselves during peace-times.
Pieces of equipment including horse-riding equipment are supplied by the respective military unit against payment of an annual compensation for use, wear and tear of such equipment. Weapons shall be supplied under the condition of due care by the OYV who has to keep them in proper and serviceable condition and who has to hand them back after leaving active military service.
2. If a OYV is using his privately purchased uniform he is doing so under the risk that his unit may refuse this uniform in case it is not properly manufactured according to military specifications.
Any OYV therefore may be interested in purchasing his uniform and equipment through the Garment Committee (Bekleidungskommission) of his unit against paying the officially budgeted prices (Etatspreise).
3. If a OYV may find himself in the difficult position to officially declare that he won’t be able to further financially support himself during his remaining period of service and if it doesn’t seem to be justified to support him granting free access to free meals and accommodation through his unit according to § 94,12 of the “Wehrordnung”, he may lose his status of being a OYV and therefore will not be transferred to reserve status after one year of service. Costs incurred by purchasing uniforms and equipment will not be redeemed in such case.
4. Any pieces of uniform remain being property of the OYV after regular discharge (after regularly being transferred to reserve status). Pieces of equipment have to be handed back to the military unit.
5. In case of mobilization a OYV will be fed and equipped on expenses of the army like regularly enlisted men. Field serviceable pieces of uniform in the property of the OYV can be kept and used; garrison serviceable pieces may be transferred to the respective “Ersatz” unit; in both cases the estimated value has to be paid to the OYV by his unit. Any compensation paid by the OYV to use official pieces of uniform and equipment shall be redeemed by his unit of the first day of the month in which mobilization was ordered.
6. Upon demobilization the OYV shall hand back all pieces of uniforms and equipment he has received from his unit. If they are not transferred to reserve status upon demobilization the OYV again has to care for uniform and equipment by himself. If he would like to keep pieces of uniform and equipment after demobilization he has to refund the respective estimated value to his unit.



Wernigk, Major and battalion commander in FAR 57
Handbook for OYV of the field artillery
11th edition, E S Mittler & Sohn, Berlin 1908

I Uniform and equipment, horses, food and accomodation of OYVs

1. OYVs have to purchase and maintain uniforms and equipment on their own expenses.
Pieces used during military service shall be supplied from stocks of the unit against payment of an annual equipment fee. Need of equipment shall be defined by regiment at the beginning of a service year and supplied to the OYV against respective payment.
Prices (Etatspreise) vary between regiments; the following figure shall only be regarded as a general hint:
Feldmütze (Krätzchen, field cap) 1.20 M
Waffenrock (tunic) 18.50 M
Halsbinde (neck binder) 0.40 M
Reithose (riding trousers) 17.75 M
Tuchhose (uniform trousers) 9.10 M
Mantel (coat) 26.60 M
Drillichjacke (white drill tunic) 2.30 M
Drillichhose (white drill trousers) 2.15 M

If it may be assumed that of each piece of uniform, except the coat where just one piece will be sufficient, two pieces will be required, the estimated value of the uniform pieces supplied by the regiment will be 129.40 M = approximately 130 M All pieces of uniform paid that way shall become personal property of the OYV.
OYVs should be interested in purchasing their uniforms through their units because only then the respective pieces will match military requirements and specifications by costing only budget prices.
In case a OYV would like to use his privately purchased uniform he is running the risk that his unit may refuse those pieces because they are not fully meeting military specifications.
The OYV also has to purchase his own boots. He would need to have two pairs of fine riding boots (not made of patent leather, “Lackleder”), one pair of infantry boots and two pairs of jack boots (kind of coach drivers boots) with spurs. Together the boots might cost around 100 Mark.
2. Pieces of equipment such as helmet, saber belt, bandolier etc., and also hand weapons will be supplied by military unit against flat compensation for use. OYV has to keep them proper and field usable on his own expense and he has to pass them back to his unit at the end of his active service year.
Compensation for one year of use will be: 2.15 M
Compensation for use of weapons will be 2.40 M
So called extra pieces (Extra-Sachen) e.g. uniform pieces made of fine and higher quality fabrics shall only be worn by OYV after service hours during private time if color, make and style comply with military specifications. But even those pieces matching military specifications shall only be worn during private time. For service only officially supplied pieces shall be worn.
Use of such extra pieces depends upon financial situation of OYV and upon location of his garrison. We would suggest the following need (which is usually estimated rather a little too high):

Extra pieces
2 caps of 5 M each 10,-- M
2 tunics of 65 M each 130,-- M
3 pairs of uniform trousers of 25 M each 75 ,-- M
3 saber belts of 4.50 M each 13.50 M each
2 saber knots of 2.50 M each 5,-- M
1 helmet including transport box 30,-- M
1 saber 17,50 M
1 coat 80,-- M
Total: 409,-- M

Estimated need of repair
Mending, ironing, cleaning. Fixing, new collars, straps, spurs (also maintenance of official pieces): approximately 86,-- M

Additional costs
When promoted to NCO rank:
1 visor cap (Schirmmütze) 6.50 M
1 saber knot 3.50 M
1 white drill tunic (Drillichjacke) 7.50 M
Fixing rank insignia and new collars 32.50 M
Total: 50,-- M

Total costs of uniform and equipment for a OYV are as follows:

Uniform pieces supplied by unit 130,-- M
Boots 100,-- M
Compensation use of equipment 2.15 M
Compensation use of weapons 2.40 M
Additional costs NCO promotion 50,-- M
Total: 784.55 M

Altogether 784.55 M of costs of uniform and equipment of which 134.55 M had to paid to unit right at the start of the one year service.
 

Tony without Kaiser

Departed
Staff member
Excellent research Joe. Thank you. If you dig through your old emails from 2000 or so you will find a conversation you and I had where I expressed my observations that: "in unit photos every single lower-ranking Mannschaften is always wearing issue helmets and Krätzchen. But in carte de Viste, Eigentumshelme and Schirmmütze with visors. This means that on the base, issue items only. Walking out or at home on leave, the Eigetumsstück could be worn."

Add your research to the issue stamps in the Krätzchen and it clearly indicates that it was first issued to a conscripted soldier, then reduced to the II Garnitur and marked as being for specifically for use by EJF. Another thought that I received via email, was that the items like this Krätzchen were purchased by the EJF from the unit, then possibly turned back in after the year's service for credit if in good condition. After all, what use does a EJF have for an issued Mannschaften Waffenrock, trousers and Krätzchen after leaving after his year of service?
 

joerookery

Active member
So called extra pieces (Extra-Sachen) e.g. uniform pieces made of fine and higher quality fabrics shall only be worn by OYV after service hours during private time if color, make and style comply with military specifications. But even those pieces matching military specifications shall only be worn during private time. For service only officially supplied pieces shall be worn.
Use of such extra pieces depends upon financial situation of OYV and upon location of his garrison.

And this backs up your first thought!
 

Gustaf

Well-known member
Staff member
The Austrians had EJF too, in the book "Good Soldier Svejk" Svejk meets a EJF when he turns out for inspection, the EJF is in Zivilzeug, and Svejk meets him later in goal, it would seem that his uniform was not delivered in time to stand for inspection, so he was sent to goal.
Gus
 

drakegoodman

New member
This is a superb thread and one that clears up a couple of cloudy questions for me about the whole premise of the OYV, not just his kit.

Landsturm Einjährig-Freiwilliger in the mantel:

4419711462_4010192f7d_b.jpg


Original size

Thanks gentlemen.

- Brett
 

Gustaf

Well-known member
Staff member
Tony,
You have an eye for the tubes, it took me a while to find him, but the Boarder Collie jumped out at me.
Gus
 

Tony without Kaiser

Departed
Staff member
Liongules said:
Actually, there might be two, isn't that a rather fat Dachshund in the drawing on the back wall?

Pretty brave to mock the finest breed to walk the earth to the guy with delete power...... [-X
 

spikeymikey

New member
Liongules said:
Actually, there might be two, isn't that a rather fat Dachshund in the drawing on the back wall?

But beautifully drawn, nevertheless. Those Germans really could draw back then!

Aaaagh, delete power!! Didn't Superman have that too? :D

And yes, this is a great thread - thank's to all for this infomation.
 

Gustaf

Well-known member
Staff member
Liongules said:
Actually, there might be two, isn't that a rather fat Dachshund in the drawing on the back wall?
Hey Mike,
Not wanting to appear to be a suck up to one with the power to delete, but the drawing is of a pig, a symbol of good luck, the snout is not so clear, but the cloven hooves are.
Best
Gus
 

Liongules

New member
Tony,

A thousand apologies, I meant no libel towards the greatest breed to walk the earth! I had a senior moment and now that Gus has pointed out that it's a drawing of a pig, I now clearly see the cloven hooves and snout, somehow that didn't really catch my attention before. :?
 
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