Re-issued M16 Steel helmet - Your opinion

aterrasse

New member
Dear All,

I know we collect WWI headgear here but I though that this one could be a nice one to post even if perhaps borderline.

It is a nice M16 steel helmet re-sssued during the Third Reich period. This one has a special place in my collection: for 60 years it was hidden in the attic of the veteran who brought it back and it was only discovered after his death. Never cleaned, never touched and complete... I like it!

Hope it is not too much off the mark... :oops:

As usual all your comments are welcome.

Best wishes to you All

Alex

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Steve

New member
That is a very nice example of a reissue single decal WWII German helmet. I would be proud of it also. I have one in not quite as nice shape in my WWII German helmet collection and consider it an integeral part of the WWII German helmet story. I think it is a great piece of history Sir in very nice condition. :thumbup:
 

Wyliecoyote

New member
Nice example, do you know who the vet came about bringing it home, how it was captured? Possibly taken off a Volksturmer in France? I picked up a S 1914 bayonet , the seller told me he got it from a fellow that also had a WWI steel field grey buckle and a M16 helmet, that his Dad captured in France or Belgium.


These kind of stories are interesting, anyhow, nice helmet.

Geo
 

Stahlhelm

Member
Very nice E.T., my favourite design. It's been a while since I've collected WW2 era helmets, but from what I remember, these WW1 models were reintroduced (with the 1940 updated paint and insignia regulations) during the invasion of France to troops of all branches of the Army - even combat troops - because of the shortage of M35s.
 

aterrasse

New member
Stahlhelm said:
Very nice E.T., my favourite design. It's been a while since I've collected WW2 era helmets, but from what I remember, these WW1 models were reintroduced (with the 1940 updated paint and insignia regulations) during the invasion of France to troops of all branches of the Army - even combat troops - because of the shortage of M35s.

Very correct Stahlhelm. In fact, a large number of infantry men were still wearing the M16 during the invasion of France and even after the begining of Barbarossa in June 1941. When replaced by the later M40 and M42, those helmets were used by the Volksturm.

Given the grey slate paint, the single decal adler and the early aluminum liner band dated 1940 (also dated the same date is the chinstrap), I would say that this one is most likely to have seen active use in battle.

Thank you for your comments gentlemen
 
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