Wappen cleaning and manual straightening.

Naprawiacz

Active member
The item cleaned with a paste made from citric acid mixed with baking soda and a little water.I applied the paste with a toothbrush.For a more difficult piece I used a brush with brass wires.
 

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Nickc

Active member
As a newbie is what you have done to clean it, just to remove the grime and dirt and leave the patina?

The reason I ask in my other collecting world, I have a thing for Colt Percussion pistols from 1847-1873, cleaning them is good, removing the patina bad. Is this the same for pickelhaubes?
 

b.loree

Administrator
Staff member
Officer wappen/plates have mercury gilt frosting, so no “wire brush”. I use a sonic cleaner and then a soft tooth brush with Hagerty Silver foam. Depending on the oxidization, I may just use the Hagerty. Citric acid and baking sofa obviously works well too. Regarding patina.....we get into the question of to clean or not to clean. Some collectors want the fittings untouched and aged others like them shiny as we see in period photos. Your choice, it is not like cleaning bronze sculpture or removing gun bluing where you are decreasing value.
 

JohnS3rd

Active member
Wojtek
Thank you for the information on cleaning brass parts. I have used citrus, lemon or lime juice to clean brass and sterling metal items, but never as tarnished as the wappen you cleaned. The use of baking soda powder seems to do the job.
Nick, Brian is pretty much on cleaning or leaving pickelhauben in ”found condition;” I use several factors to decide what I like related to displaying a helmet. Here is an example of what I chose recently to leave as is because the condition tells a story.


That said, a mint or near mint might be dusted but cleaning should be avoided.
John
 

Naprawiacz

Active member
If you have brass fittings in one colour together with wappen,then I agree with you.I don't clean patina.Pickelhaube in different colours looks funny.

Regards.
Wojtek
As a newbie is what you have done to clean it, just to remove the grime and dirt and leave the patina?

The reason I ask in my other collecting world, I have a thing for Colt Percussion pistols from 1847-1873, cleaning them is good, removing the patina bad. Is this the same for pickelhaubes?
As a newbie is what you have done to clean it, just to remove the grime and dirt and leave the patina?

The reason I ask in my other collecting world, I have a thing for Colt Percussion pistols from 1847-1873, cleaning them is good, removing the patina bad. Is this the same for pickelhaubes?
 

Sandmann

Well-known member
From a professional Restorer I got this hint to clean metal parts. Take cleaning alcohol and finest crayon chalk (the matherial for the stucco). Mix it to make a fine paste out of it and clean the metal-parts with a Q-Tip. After drying the crayon chalk can be easily removed with a soft brush, because the alcohol evaporates without leaving any residue.
 

Naprawiacz

Active member
Thank you Sandy for this info, I have to try it out! Have a nice day.
From a professional Restorer I got this hint to clean metal parts. Take cleaning alcohol and finest crayon chalk (the matherial for the stucco). Mix it to make a fine paste out of it and clean the metal-parts with a Q-Tip. After drying the crayon chalk can be easily removed with a soft brush, because the alcohol evaporates without leaving any residue.
 

Nickc

Active member
Wojtek
Thank you for the information on cleaning brass parts. I have used citrus, lemon or lime juice to clean brass and sterling metal items, but never as tarnished as the wappen you cleaned. The use of baking soda powder seems to do the job.
Nick, Brian is pretty much on cleaning or leaving pickelhauben in ”found condition;” I use several factors to decide what I like related to displaying a helmet. Here is an example of what I chose recently to leave as is because the condition tells a story.


That said, a mint or near mint might be dusted but cleaning should be avoided.
John
You are right that is so cool.

I use this very strong disfectant/germ killer called Vulpex, it was recommended to me by one of my US pistol collector friends.

Typically it is used for deep cleaning hospital wards from MRSA and the like, you mix up 1 part Vulpex to 5 parts water, apply with a soft brush, leave a few minutes and then wipe off with a moist cloth and then dry.
First time I used it I was a bit sceptical but it cleaned the cylinder of an 1863 Colt Mod 1860 that fought in the civil war to the point that the rolled engraving on the cylinder reappeared!

The snag with Vulpex is the price £70 for a litre
 

Pontiac9999

Member
AAAAHHHHHHH....a brass wire brush...........NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!! Just use Hagerty Silver foam and a gentle touch. NEVER a wire brush......😲😲😲😲😲😲😲😲😲😲
 

Naprawiacz

Active member
AAAAHHHHHHH....a brass wire brush...........NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!! Just use Hagerty Silver foam and a gentle touch. NEVER a wire brush......😲😲😲😲😲😲😲😲😲😲
Examine the photos in enlargement. Do you see any damage to the material? A brass brush so delicate to pull off the first layer. I am writing this as a practitioner, not a theorist. With this condition of the subject, no chemistry will do a miracle, but what do I know?
 
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