German medical collection

Gustaf

Well-known member
Staff member
I have a question about a bandage I acquired in the late 60s. It was in one of the ammunition pockets on a German Tornester. I always assumed it was WWI vintage. I have been able to find the same bandage available, and some sources date them from the 50s. The paper wrapper on the inside of the cloth cover has Fractur text, and that lead me to believe it would have been an early item, but I now doubt it. does anyone have any knowledge of these?
Best
Gus
 

Jupiter66

Active member
Hello Gustaf

Excuse me for the delay! The first up is WW1 and the second is post WW1. Remember that the WW1 tonisters were reused for the second conflict.

In paper dressings are very little used on the front, because they absorb themselves too easily in the rain or the blood. They are especially used in hospitals from the inside.
 

Gustaf

Well-known member
Staff member
Is it possible that they were using surplus WWI bandages? The top bandage was originally in the cloth cover, I opened it myself when I found it.
Best
Gus
 

Jupiter66

Active member
Here is a photo simple but rich in details: it is an aid station and the wounded are Russians

img_4219.jpg


It should be noted:

-The Super tunic of a medical officer who left his stahlhelm foot for the needs of the photo.
-The folding stretcher where the Russian soldier...
- and the Porter uses a strap of MG for the transport of the wounded... like what these straps are not reserved to the MG08

img_4221.jpg
 

kaiser

Active member
Wow those 'bags' are in great shape nice and clean for being that old :thumb up:
Love to have sutch a canteen in my collection but never had the chanse to find one that was matching my quality standart of collecting
You added cool stuf to your collection :bravo:
Seems that photobucket did not affect this post becose al the fotos are stil visible

Jonas
 

Jupiter66

Active member
Hello Jonas

Thank you for your comment! The Light beige surgery kits (downstairs) came from a lot of a WW1 doctor officer and the fabric is in better condition and the second is an old grated cloth (it comes from the campaign hospitals) ...

I use a picture host of the French forums [-X

Kind regards

 

911car

Well-known member
This is really impressive, Jupiter. Wonderful post.
If you are so interested in medical care in WW1, I hope you have read "Vie des Martyrs" by Georges Duhamel, the famous French writer (I suppose you read French). He was a field surgeon at hospitals behind the front (notably at Verdun) during a large part of WW1 and described his daily practice in most gruesome details. It is wonderfully written though. Of course it is on the French side (although they occasionally had German patients). Takes you back to the crude reality of war...
Bruno
 

Jupiter66

Active member
Hello Bruno

How are you?

I know very well this book and it is very realistic .... :bravo:



It should not be said but I collect the medical WW1 (France, USA and Germany) and here is a small sample of the French medical ... \:D/



We have, from left to right, a first-class administration officer, a second class major doctor, a colonial doctor aide major first class and a nurse Sergeant SIM 18

Friendly
 
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