Chinaware

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stuka f
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Chinaware

Post by stuka f » Sat May 13, 2017 3:50 pm

is what I got today.
16 plates of the Belgian Garde Civique, sort of dad's army, dissolved on 13/10/ 1914. Mainly because the German army didn't reconigzed members of the GC as regular soldiers, but rather as guerilla and therfore where put to death when caught.
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Always looking for Belgian Congo stuff!
http://virtueel-museum-antwerpen.webnode.be/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
cheers
|<ris
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badener
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Re: Chinaware

Post by badener » Sat May 13, 2017 9:13 pm

Very cool Stuka! :D
It must be a Bavarian. They always smell the worst!

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glenn66
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Re: Chinaware

Post by glenn66 » Sun May 14, 2017 2:13 am

Amazing find!

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stuka f
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Re: Chinaware

Post by stuka f » Sun May 14, 2017 3:56 am

Thank you.
Here are my other GC related items.
A officer vet; green cloth. The spike and bush need to be restaured.
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Here is a black cloth GC helmet. The only one I ever seen. Usualy ther are blue.
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Buttons. This is how it started....
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Some more chinaware.
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A unknown officer
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And my buggle.
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Always looking for Belgian Congo stuff!
http://virtueel-museum-antwerpen.webnode.be/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
cheers
|<ris
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edwin
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Re: Chinaware

Post by edwin » Sat May 20, 2017 2:30 am

Very nice, congrats!

Regards,

Edwin

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stuka f
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Re: Chinaware

Post by stuka f » Sat May 20, 2017 4:16 am

Thank you.
Always looking for Belgian Congo stuff!
http://virtueel-museum-antwerpen.webnode.be/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
cheers
|<ris
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joerookery
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Re: Chinaware

Post by joerookery » Sat May 20, 2017 11:13 am

From the upcoming book:
Garde Civique
Belgian men from ages twenty-one to forty-five years who were not inducted into the army were to be organized into the Garde Civique (National Guard), which was not subordinate to the War Minister but to the Minister of the Interior. This meant the Garde Civique mission and command arrangements were not at all clear. There were two organizations: an “active” and a “nonactive” Garde Civique. In towns with populations over ten thousand, the Garde Civique was active, which is to say it had a limited degree of leadership training. Actives wore full uniforms (which individual members were obliged to purchase) and drilled regularly. The nonactive Garde was expected to perform police functions during emergencies and only when activated by the King. It was to play no military role. In a move that was stranger than fiction, before the invasion, the Belgian government called up about one hundred thousand nonactives but failed to mobilize the forty-six thousand active Garde members. The nonactive Garde Civique was inundated with applications during the first days of the war. New recruits, who normally wore a short blue tunic, were required as of August 5, 1914 to add an arm-band and cockade with the national colors and to bear their weapons openly. Three days later, a blue shirt was required as well. Some members guarded bridges, railroad lines, and other sites of strategic importance in the opening days of the war.
The role of the active Garde Civique varied considerably, with a few units actually participating in the fighting (Figure 3). More typically, Garde members dug trenches and set up and then dismantled barricades. Whatever they were up to, active Garde members were required to wear their uniforms. Most Garde detachments were disarmed and disbanded by August 18, 1914.
Imageguarde civique by Joe Robinson, on Flickr
VR/Joe
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the facts that are interesting in history, but the questions and their
answers - and these can never be fixed.

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poniatowski
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Re: Chinaware

Post by poniatowski » Mon May 22, 2017 10:29 am

Interesting stuff!

:D Ron
I really do need to know more about this....

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Re: Chinaware

Post by Pickelhaube » Wed Jun 14, 2017 4:07 am

Nice chinaware, it's the first time i see plates of the Garde-Civique from Louvain.

Here in Belgium, most collectors don't collect Garde-Civique stuff. Which is good for me, because i do collect it since there is alot of variation in the uniforms and headdresses of the Garde-Civique. When i've finally done reorganizing my collectionroom, i'll post some pictures of my Garde-Civique stuff.

Greetings

Pickelhaube
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stuka f
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Re: Chinaware

Post by stuka f » Wed Jun 14, 2017 4:39 pm

Looking forward to see your collection!
Always looking for Belgian Congo stuff!
http://virtueel-museum-antwerpen.webnode.be/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
cheers
|<ris
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